Concert and a Movie (Glory) Tonight – 9/28

I know it’s a week early and SUPER short notice – but Andrew McKnight – a great folk musician, is playing a concert TONIGHT at the Shenandoah Museum in Winchester before the screening of next week’s film, Glory. If you’re looking for something to do tonight, check it out! Andrew will perform from 7 to 8.

If you want to check out Andrew’s music, go to his site and have a listen!

Here is a link that will tell you a little more about the tonight’s event. http://artistdata.sonicbids.com/andrew-mcknight/shows/winchester-museum-of-the-shenandoah-valley-sep-28-2012/869980/

Thoughts on Amistad

Just nitpicking, but Cinque certainly did seem to know an awful lot about celestial navigation. Enough to attack the Spaniards and turn the ship east in the middle of the night…

That was one snazzy dome on the Capitol there in 1839… and to think all those Civil War era photos had me thinking it wasn’t finished until AFTER 1865! Silly me!

Wait, so you mean that people of color are actually shown as intelligent, developed characters with un-stilted dialogue and actual opinions? Wow.

Again with the gun problems, but in the liberation of the slave fortress, one guy’s hammer didn’t even fall when he pulled the trigger. It makes me miss Last of the Mohicans (Pennsylvania long rifle, in fairly common use by 1730, btw!)

 

Tweets from Amistad

Any scene is more dramatic in the rain…

Let me sneak by your dinner party unnoticed…on a ship…full of captured African people…..

JQA…my hero…catching a cat nap but still paying attention

Someone is horribly off key…

Was the professor meant to be portrayed as an idiot?

A handshake and now they magical think the same thoughts?? I think that I like the magic swirling leaves better…(no bias at all…..)

So they tried it twice in the same court with 2 different judges and then they skipped a court and jump to the Supreme Court

The Patriot tweets (except on a blog)

Susan: I shake my head at you and your inability to make a rocking chair

Because anyone can run into a burning building, get exactly what they need and not get stopped by a hot spot. Totally normal

Aren’t there too many continental soldiers in the first battle scene?

Col. Tavington: Let me kill everyone because I have no money at home in England

Cornwallis: (looking at the lady) Are you really that dumb? Col. Tavington: Waiter! Another drink please!

Beach=Swamp…those 2 places are interchangeable right?

While I die because I have been shot, let me forget about the pain and throw this gun to you with perfect timing.

How many toy soldiers did that kid have? Enough to last through the war?

Die well dressed. Words to live by

When did the dogs get back? He calls them from the fort and then they disappear and then come back right at the end???

When did she have a kid???

 

A Movie is Chosen

In late breaking news, UMW Senior Sara Gross, an American Studies major, finally chose a movie on which to base her HIST329 semester project. Gross initially indicated a desire to analyze the 1992 favorite, A League of Their Own, but failure to find ample scholarly examination of the film forced the determined student to redirect her search. She wanted to avoid movies with a military background, saying that she’d “been there, done that,” so she turned her attention elsewhere. After an exhaustive search of UMW’s legendary Academic Complete database, Gross delightedly reported “a butt ton” of adequate sources for Robert Redford’s 1994 film, Quiz Show. Kudos to Jim Groom for providing such an awesome search too.

More details on this breaking news will be published as the story unfolds.

Bibliography due for Sept 13th

Bennetts, Leslie. “’The Untouchables’: De Palma’s Departure.” The New York Times, June 6, 1987, http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/hnpnewyorktimes/docview/110702384/13923208D43345CED27/1?accountid=12299 (accessed September 12, 2012).

Bergreen, Laurence. Capone: the Man and the Era. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1994.

 Canby, Vincent. “Film: De Niro in ‘The Untouchables’.” The New York Times June 3, 1987, http://search.proquest.com.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/hnpnewyorktimes/docview/110776027/13923208D43345CED27/2?accountid=12299 (accessed September 12, 2012).

Heimel, Paul W. Eliot Ness: The Real Story. Nashville, TN: Cumberland House, 2000.

Levine, Harry G., and Craig Reinarman. “From Prohibition to Regulation: Lessons from Alcohol Policy for Drug Policy.” The Milbank Quarterly 69, no. 3 (1991): 461-494. http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/stable/view/3350105?&Search=yes&searchText=Prohibition&searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3FQuery%3DMarijuana%2BProhibition%2B%26gw%3Djtx%26acc%3Don%26prq%3DMarijuana%2BProhibition%2Bin%2Bthe%2BUnited%2BStates%2B%2BHistory%2BAND%2BAnalysis%2Bof%2Ba%2BFailed%2BPolicy%26Search%3DSearch%26hp%3D25%26wc%3Don (accessed on September 12, 2012).

Ness, Eliot, and Oscar Fraley. The Untouchables. New York: Julian Messner, Inc, 1957.

Nickel, Steven. “The Real Eliot Ness.” American History Illustrated 22, no. 6 (October 1987): 42-52. http://lgdata.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/2296/507362/Chicago_Turabian_Non-Print.pdf (accessed September 3, 2012).

Schoenberg, Robert J. Mr. Capone. New York:William Morrow and Company, Inc, 1992.

 

 

Cold Mountain

Campbell, Edward D. C. Review of Cold Mountain (film), directed by Anthony Minghella. Southern Cultures 10, no. 2 (June 2, 2004): 103-105. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=19983926&site=ehost-live (accessed August 29, 2012.

Chesire, Godfrey. “Personal in My Memory.” Southern Cultures 17, no. 3 (Fall 2011): 28-38. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=63178600&site=ehost-live (accessed August 29, 2012).

Inscoe, John C. Review of Cold Mountain (film), directed by Anthony Minghella. Journal of American History 91, no. 3 (Dec. 2004): 1127-1129.  http://www.jstor.org/stable/3663028 (accessed August 29, 2012).

Myers, Robert M. “‘It’s What People Say We’re Fighting For’: Representing the Lost Cause in Cold Mountain.“ In Why We Fought: America’s Wars in Film and History, edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O’Connor, 121-133. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2008. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=237636&site=ehost-live (accessed August 29, 2012).

Stanchak, John E. Review of Cold Mountain (film), directed by Anthony Minghella. Civil War Times 42, no. 6 (Feb. 2004): 32-39. http://ezproxy.umw.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=11533461&site=ehost-live (accessed August 29, 2012).

 

A tentative list of sources for Oliver Stone’s JFK

JFK: The Movie
Michael Rogin
The American Historical Review , Vol. 97, No. 2 (Apr., 1992), pp. 500-505
Published by: The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Historical Association
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2165731

 

JFK: Historical Fact/Historical Film
Robert A. Rosenstone
The American Historical Review , Vol. 97, No. 2 (Apr., 1992), pp. 506-511
Published by: The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Historical Association
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2165732

 

JFK and the Culture of Violence
Marcus Raskin
The American Historical Review , Vol. 97, No. 2 (Apr., 1992), pp. 486-499
Published by: The University of Chicago Press on behalf of the American Historical Association
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2165730

 

JFK by Oliver Stone
Review by: Robert Brent Toplin
The Journal of American History , Vol. 79, No. 3, Discovering America: A Special Issue (Dec., 1992), pp. 1266-1268
Published by: Organization of American Historians
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2080960

 

JFK by Oliver Stone
Review by: William W. Phillips
The Journal of American History , Vol. 79, No. 3, Discovering America: A Special Issue (Dec., 1992), pp. 1264-1266
Published by: Organization of American Historians
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2080959

 

JFK by Oliver Stone
Review by: Thomas C. Reeves
The Journal of American History , Vol. 79, No. 3, Discovering America: A Special Issue (Dec., 1992), pp. 1263-1264
Published by: Organization of American Historians
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2080958

 

Reenactment, Fantasy, and the Paranoia of History: Oliver Stone’s Docudramas
Marita Sturken
History and Theory , Vol. 36, No. 4, Theme Issue 36: Producing the Past: Making Histories Inside and Outside the Academy (Dec., 1997), pp. 64-79
Published by: Wiley-Blackwell for Wesleyan University
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2505575

 

JFK: The Question of Propaganda
Amos Vogel
The Antioch Review , Vol. 50, No. 3, Thinking: Books or Movies? (Summer, 1992), pp. 578-585
Published by: Antioch Review, Inc.
Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4612571

 

Briley, Ron. “Teaching JFK( 1991): Potential Dynamite in the Hands of Our Youth?.” Film & History (03603695) 28, no. 1/2 (February 1998): 8-15. Communication & Mass Media Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed September 12, 2012).

 

von Bothmer, Bernard1. “Oliver Stone’s JFK: Political Assassination, Kennedy, and Vietnam.” War, Literature & The Arts: An International Journal Of The Humanities 17, no. 1/2 (November 2005): 242-251. OmniFile Full Text Mega (H.W. Wilson), EBSCOhost (accessed September 12, 2012).

 

Romanowski, William D. “Oliver Stone’s JFK.” Journal Of Popular Film & Television 21, no. 2 (Summer93 1993): 63. Academic Search Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed September 12, 2012).

 

Keller, James R. “Oliver Stone’s JFK and the `circulation of social energy’ and the `textuality of history.’ (Cover story).” Journal Of Popular Film & Television 21, no. 2 (Summer93 1993): 72. Academic Search Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed September 12, 2012).

 

Benoit, William L., and Dawn M. Nill. “Oliver Stone’s defense of JFK.” Communication Quarterly 46, no. 2 (Spring98 1998): 127-143. Communication & Mass Media Complete, EBSCOhost (accessed September 12, 2012).

The Last of the Mohicans (If I were to have a twitter account…)

  • Didn’t we talk about public displays of affection in the last movie? Oh but wait…they are seemingly private displays of affection that are totally realistic for the time period…..but wait….. And it is also totally realistic that he would be able to run through a battle killing 3 or 4 people along the way to reach his love in time to save her from being scalped….totally would happen just like that…
  • The father in this movie also played Powhatan in Disney’s Pocahontas…..I felt that just needed to be shared.
  • Totally could have made it over that waterfall…in a canoe…no prob…and totally can survive that jump from the waterfall….because I’m that awesome.
  • What do you mean you can’t jump through waterfalls and have gunpowder still work?! What is this madness?!
  • 2 broken branches=the path to love
  • No please don’t jump off a cliff, take my bloody hand instead….never mind the fact  you just witnessed me killing the person that you were infatuated with that was trying to save your life

 

Snarking through “Last of the Mohicans”

So while I don’t actually use Twitter, I couldn’t help from fake tweeting during the movie

-”The French have no stomach to fight”… Except for those half dozen odd wars you’ve been fighting for the past 60 years or so…

-At least this time jumping through waterfalls got somebody’s gunpowder wet!

-Convenient Plot Device Canoes! Improbable Aiming Skills! What wonderful tropes!

-It’s not a period-inaccurate PDA if you go behind the earthworks

- Russell Means played Chingachgook in this movie, and voiced Powhatan in “Pocahontas”. That’s either a great resume or a damning indictment of the number of famous Native American actors